Fujimania Part 2

There are five lakes around Fujisan and in the morning of my return day, I rode with a bus to the neighboring lake called Saiko (which simply means “west lake”), to a traditional reed roof houses village with Fujisan views.

The weather was going downhill with more and more clouds, but Fujisan was still visible. Lake Saiko is smaller than Lake Kawaguchi and has only two small villages at its east and west ends. There is no train line going to the lake. In the past the bus rode from 9:00 in the morning to around 17:00 every half hour, bringing tourists to and from Lake Saiko, but now there are only two buses during weekdays and three buses during the weekend, that’s all! So you have to time it well to get there. It was worth the ride though, since the traditional reed roof house village is a very nice place to see.

Half of the around thirty houses are museums, the other half house crafts shops and I did quite some shopping, pottery items, incense and an arts shop with the drawings of a Japanese artists, he draws Buddhist themes, animals and also dragons 🙂


There are restaurants in three of the houses and I had some udon noodles there before heading back to Kawaguchi. Arrived there I rode once more with the gondola up the hill for more Fujisan views and then headed back home.

It was a fantastic little trip, but let’s be honest, without sunshine and the mountain out it’s only half as nice. You definitely need good weather for visiting the place 🙂 but if you have good weather, lucky you! The pictures do not do the closeness of the mountain justice. It’s an awesome place and I shall surely go there again 🙂

Fujimania Part 1

Since I, for the first time ever, had some holidays left that I had to take until the end of March, I took two days off and wondered what to do with them. Our state of emergency had just ended and we were officially allowed to travel again. (It’s possible to travel also during the state of emergency if necessary.)
I decided on going to Lake Kawaguchi at the base of Mt. Fuji in the hope to have good weather and get a proper look at the famous mountain. I’ve actually never been to Lake Kawaguchi before, dreading the masses of tourists there. It’s, after all, the main spot for Fujisan. But since the number of tourists is so much reduced, I thought now was a good chance to head there.
It’s only two hours by train and off I went. On my arrival day the weather was cloudy and cold and the top of Fujisan hid in the clouds. Nevertheless the base was visible and wow, Kawaguchi is really close to the mountain with no other hill anymore in between. I locked my luggage away in a station locker and promptly rented a bicycle to go exploring. Lake Kawaguchi is exactly north of the mountain and I rode along the northern shore visiting parks and a large shrine.

Lake Kawaguchi is at a height of about 850 meters and was much colder than Yokohama and I was happy for the down jacket I brought. It was so cold and windy that I needed a break and went to the very nice Yamanashi gem museum. They have a large collection of very pretty gems and a nice, big shop also.
Then I checked into my hotel and it was perfectly situated at the south side of the lake with a great view at the lake and the mountain beyond it. Said mountain peeled itself more and more out of the clouds and the sunset was breathtaking while revealing the top of the mountain.


Sunrise was before 6:00 and I woke up at 6:00 and couldn’t resist peaking through the curtains and OMG not a cloud in the blue sky and a most magnificent view. After that I couldn’t really sleep anymore and got up around seven, having breakfast while enjoying the view.


In walking distance from the hotel is a ropeway up the hill and I went up there with one of the first gondolas. That hill is 1090 meters high and allows an undisturbed view at the entire Fujisan. Such an awesome sight.


On I went to the train station and rode three stations to a place called Shimoyoshida where there is a shrine and a five story pagoda with a famous Fujisan view. The view is indeed magnificent but you have to struggle up a ginormous over 400 stairs to get up there. It is well worth the climb though. The pagoda is famous for cherry blossom views but I was two weeks too early for that unfortunately.


Back at lake Kawaguchi I rented a bicycle again and rode along the south side of the lake to enjoy the views from there. Last but not least I took a boat ride on the lake with more Fujisan views.
In the evening and after another magnificent sunset, there was a surprise fireworks over the lake, which was visible from my hotel window as well and it concluded a perfect day at the incredible mountain.

Mt. Fuji – 2nd Station

With the mercury ever rising and rising, I saw no way to do e.g. temple sightseeing around Numazu. A third trip to Osezaki also seemed kinda boring and thus I decided to get higher up to escape the brooding heat and that was an extremely good idea! I wanted to go to one of Mt. Fuji’s 5th stations (there are four or them) but I soon found out that Mt. Fuji is closed for the climbing season of 2020 due to the coronavirus. This may sound odd, but: around 100,000 people climb Mt. Fuji every year, most of those climbs happen during the climbing season in July and August, when there is no snow even on the top of the 3776 meter mountain. Also, usually, the huts on the stations 5 to 9 are open during those 2 months. But, this year, everything was shut down. However, one of the bus services up the mountain still went to the 2nd station on the south side, which lies at 1450 meters. That sounded high enough to me and I rode to Mishima by train and from there around 90 min with a normal city bus, not a coach bus, as I had expected. The bus passes also Fuji Safari Park, but I’ve been there once before and it’s “only” at 900 meter elevation. The bus usually climbs up until the Fujimino 5th station but ended this year at the 2nd station with its park called Mizugatsuka.


At Mizugatsuka is a large (pretty newly built) souvenir shop and restaurant, a parking lot for a thousand cars and that’s it. It offers various walking routes around the area. It also has jogging/running courses around the car park and hordes of runners galloped around there. The by far best thing of the place was the temperature – a balmy 23 degrees Celsius. When I returned to Numazu in the evening it was 37 degrees Celsius there… Mt. Fuji itself, which you can theoretically see from a clearing in the forest and from atop a nearby hill, was shrouded in what I have come to call the mothership cloud. If there are clouds, they get stuck at Mt. Fuji, since it’s in their way coming from the sea barely a few kilometers away. It looked to me like the clouds were starting at around 2000 meters elevation. I then ventured on one of the walks/hikes that start from the car park of about 90 min to a shrine at the flank of the mountain. The path was fantastic. Very easy to walk, almost no ups and downs as it went parallel to the mountain and since it had been super wet all of July, every log and rock around was covered in very green moss.

It was absolutely beautiful to walk through these woods. The path was sometimes hard to discern, but every few meters pink ribbons in the trees helped to identify the path and here and there were also signposts. The shrine was standing guard over a cave and a few underpasses, but the cave itself was off limits and also didn’t look very big, just for one person to be able to crawl through, which is not my kind of thing 😉

At the car park were maybe a hundred cars, on the trail to the shrine, I met maybe ten people. It was a great walk and a welcome respite from the omnipresent heat. The bus had around eight passengers along the route. I don’t know how busy the area is during non-covid times.
I once attempted to climb Mt. Fuji some 15 years ago. It was end of July, the bus from Shinjuku was full, there were hundreds and hundreds of people on the same trail. (Despite wonderful weather in Tokyo, there was a thunderstorm around Mt. Fuji. It rained like hell, I slipped on the wet rocks and hurt my knee and gave up, spending the rest of the night in the 8th station hut). I’m not sure how many people would be at this second station and Mizugatsuka park in a normal year, but I surely enjoyed the relative peace and quiet. It was kind of just right, a few people there to make you feel not too lonely, but not enough people to disturb you. So, even though I didn’t see the top of the mountain, I thoroughly enjoyed the walk to the shrine and the fantastic temperatures.

New Neighborhood

One of the nice things of moving is that you get to explore your new neighborhood 🙂
I’m not yet done exploring of course, but here are some major spots around me.
Apart from having Yokohama Lalaport and Ikea in bicycle distance, which I find extremely practical, the major highlight of the neighborhood is the Tsurumi river. It has “endless” bicycle paths to either side of it and it’s a pleasure to ride along there.
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Next there are two fairly big temples close by, the Tokanji and the Rinkoji.
Tokanji:
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Rinkoji:
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The Rinkoji comes with a view of Mt. Fuji:
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I have the slight feeling that a house for the dead here costs more than a house for the living…

Let’s see what else I will find while exploring y new neighborhood 🙂